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Racist Tweets from a Racist President

Racist Tweets from a Racist President

A few days ago, I was considering writing about “The Squad” and my hope that they would find common ground with Democratic leadership. With eyes on the 2020 prize, I believe a more centrist Democratic candidate and platform is the best way to displace Trump. Nancy Pelosi is playing the long game and she’s right to do so. More on that later, because over the weekend POTUS found a way to unify the country more successfully than at any other time during his political life.

This isn’t about politics. This is about character.

Prior to this weekend’s attacks, I would contend that most decent people already viewed POTUS as a racist. His history is well-documented, here and elsewhere. I’ll spare you another recitation.

The tweet above is definitionally racist. The spin from the sycophants is both predictable and disgusting. Whatever your politics, we must demand more of our elected leaders.

We can disagree on policy from A to Z. I’m always up for a discussion on how to make the world a better place, all the better if opinions diverge. Our political structure is built for slow and careful deliberation and its history is rich with debate. None of this is the point.

We should, and must, all call out racism by its name.

Anything short of that is complicity. Worse still are those in politics and among the public who defend these tweets and deflect to politics. There is no modern equivalent among the Democrats. None.

So let’s be direct and honest, POTUS is a racist. This isn’t new and the evidence is overwhelming. These tweets mark the end of the counterargument. Supporting Trump is supporting racism.


Unity in Division

For Democrats, for the first time in months, the focus is on something other than their warring factions. Across the party and far beyond, this abject racism serves as a rallying cry for all who reject it. This isn’t the beginning (housing discrimination, Central Park 5, birtherism) and won’t be the end, but it is an important inflection point. It’s long past time to unite around basic norms and decency.

Set politics aside and demand more from our political leaders. All elected officials who fail to condemn Trump are complicit. They lack the character to serve this country effectively. Vote them all out.

Those who still support Trump enable him and embolden his racism, and are themselves racist – no equivocation necessary. Decent people must fight this scourge at every turn. Anything less is distinctly un-American.

Shut Up and Dribble, Part 2

Winners, on the field and off.

As a country, we’ve long found pride and a sense of community through competitive sports and the victories of “our” athletes and teams, whether local, regional, or national. From youth participation and all that it imbues in our children to elite level competition and the myriad rooting interests we develop throughout our lives, sports are a cultural phenomenon the depth and breadth of which has few parallels.

The USWNT’s recent World Cup performance has earned the team, its star players, and women’s soccer, much due acclaim in recent days. They took care of business on the field and are using their platform to advocate for equal pay, LGBTQ acceptance, and more. If this makes you uncomfortable – good. Change isn’t easy, but they’re arguing for a more equal society and we should listen.

Like so many athletes before them, they’ve been told to shut up and dribble. LeBron didn’t. Neither will Rapinoe & Co.


Historical Context

Sport isn’t some siloed, esoteric enterprise that stands apart from our broader culture. Quite the opposite is true, sports have always reflected and often led, on a range of social and political issues.

  • Jesse Owens at the Berlin Olympics.
  • Jackie Robinson in MLB (too late, but well before the Civil Rights Act).
  • USA Hockey in Lake Placid.
  • The 1999 Women’s World Cup win.

All of these performances had lasting effects far beyond the field of play. To argue otherwise ignores history and context.


Criticism of the Team

In response to Megan Rapinoe’s assertion that the team wouldn’t visit the White House: “they should respect the President and country”.

Fun facts: the Warriors haven’t visited Trump and this year’s Patriots visit quietly fell by the wayside. I don’t need to recite all the reasons I wouldn’t go and I can’t know the leading motives of any of the teams, but if you think they should show up for the photo op and pledge fealty to a racist and anti-LGBT administration, you’re a gutless sycophant, not a proud patriot.

They celebrate too much, or the wrong way.

Among pro athletes, inclusive of soccer players, they’re rather subdued. If they were men, you’d ignore it. Supporting data: all men’s team sports.

They “stomped on” / “danced on” the flag.

This is false. Yes, it was dropped during the post-game celebration. This is wrong and shouldn’t have been allowed to happen. But in the moment, distracted by having achieved the pinnacle of your career in sports, things happen. Get over it.

The flag was then quickly picked up by a teammate, not stomped or danced upon. If you’re upset about the flag being on the ground for 2-3 seconds, that’s not what you’re actually upset about.


American Heroes

This is the best women’s soccer team the world has seen. They dominated the deepest Women’s World Cup field in history.

Off the field, they are using their success and their platform for good. Their impact is significant and I believe lasting.

We celebrate winners, always have. We, with the benefit of history, celebrate agents of positive change. They are both. As such, they are heroes. Not just to the tens of thousands of girls soccer players they will inspire for a generation, not just to the LGBT community, not just to women, no, this team should be embraced as heroes by all Americans.

Still don’t like this team? Still want them to “shut up and dribble”? They won’t.

Watch the NYC celebration here and below. If you oppose these positive and inclusive messages and think this group un-patriotic, our world views are irreconcilable. History will judge. I like my odds, a lot.

If you’re feeling aggrieved by this team, their strength and their voice, think long and hard about why. You’ll find answers in the realms of blind loyalty to POTUS, the fake patriotism of right-wing media, likely mixed with heavy doses of sexism and fear. Prove me wrong.

 

 

 

Trump Launches Re-election Campaign in a State He Can’t Win

Trump won Florida in 2016. He won’t in 2020.

Last night, Trump launched his re-election bid in Orlando, Florida. Despite the raucous crowd and having won the state in 2016, he won’t win Florida in 2020.

Yes, the same state that Ron Desantis and Rick Scott won in 2018.

Let’s review those races:

 

  • Race
  • Trump, 2016
  • DeSantis, 2018
  • Scott, 2018
  • Margin of Victory
  • 113,000
  • 33,000
  • 10,000

 

In these races, 8M-9.5M votes were cast. At most, these margins represent a separation of ~1.4%.

Most recent Presidential races in the state have been similarly close. You know the closest one. W followed that up with the widest margin of victory since his father’s win in 1988. Even that 2004 win was by fewer than 400K votes (over 7M total cast) and while his brother was serving as Governor.

So what’s different in 2020?

Amendment 4 & the Puerto Rican exodus.

 


Amendment 4

Some background, from Wikipedia:

After the abolition of slavery in the United States, Florida enacted Black Codes, which restricted freedoms for African Americans and led to mass incarceration. The 1868 Florida Constitution enacted felony disenfranchisement, a ban on voting for felons even after completing parole and probation, disproportionately impacting African Americans. Though other Jim Crow laws, such as education requirements, were repealed in successive constitutions, felon disenfranchisement continued.

In 2016, 6.1 million adults in the United States could not vote due to felony disenfranchisement laws. In 2018, Florida was one of four U.S. states that enacted permanent felony disenfranchisement, affecting 1.7 million felons. Felons must wait five to seven years after the completion of their sentence before they can apply to have their voting rights restored by the State Board of Executive Clemency, which is composed of the Governor of Florida and the Florida Cabinet, and meets four times per year at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida. Florida’s disenfranchised felons constituted 10% of the adult population, and 21.5% of the adult African American population.

In 2018, Florida voters, by a wide margin (65/35), righted this long-standing wrong by restoring voting rights to of Floridians with felony convictions, exclusive of murderers and sex offenders, after the completion of their sentence.

Effective January 8, 2019, 1.4M ex-felons – about 10% of Florida’s adult population, along with one in five black Floridians – became eligible to vote.

Naturally, Florida’s Republican-controlled legislature and Trumpian Governor are doing everything they can to controvert the will of the voters and Jim Crow the shit out of the new law.

But let’s look at how Amendment 4 might impact 2020.

Vox ran the numbers and concluded that Democrats might gain ~48,000 votes, with “an additional 40,000 votes that could be cast on behalf of either party.” This doesn’t change the outcome of the state’s 2016 Presidential election, but both the recent Senate and Gubernatorial races might have gone the other way.

 


Puerto Rican Exodus

In the wake of Hurricane Maria, many thousands of Puerto Ricans fled to Florida. The New York Times breaks down the potential electoral impact of that migration, here, where they suggest Democrats might gain 40,000 votes.

 


The Numbers

48,000 + 40,000 = less than 113,000

If you read NYT or Vox articles I’ve cited, you might wonder why I chose them, since they both conclude that these forces are insufficient to flip the state. But they’re trying to close the 2016 gap of 113,000. The 2018 races suggest that the sentiment gap is much smaller.

Ron DeSantis ran as a Trump clone. He won by just 33,000 votes. Sure, it was a midterm election and turnout was down slightly from 2016 (8M vs. 9.5M). But for a midterm, that’s relatively strong and higher turnout generally favors Democrats.

With Trump essentially on the ballot, this race offers the best possible proxy for the coming 2020 race. The gap has closed, significantly.

48,000 + 40,000 = far more than 33,000

Trump is losing supporters and the broader electorate is shifting away from him.

 


As was made clear in 2016, nothing is certain and voters are unpredictable. All 2020 outcomes are still possible. Still, it’s hard to ignore Trump’s weak early polling, the evidence waning support, and some 88,000 new Democratic votes in Florida.

Trump loses Florida in 2020 and can’t win the presidency without it.

 

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